When Should You Rotate Your Tires?

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When Should You Rotate Your Tires?

Being a front tire can be hard work. A front tire typically has to deal with more weight including the car’s engine, is responsible for all of the steering duties, and when you hit the brakes – the front tires get all of the vehicle’s weight shifting forward. All of these factors can lead to uneven tire wear between the front and back tires.

By rotating your tires to different positions on your vehicle, you help avoid uneven tire wear. This helps you extend the life of your tires, maintain a smooth ride and get better gas mileage.

So how often do they need to be rotated? Schedules range from every 3,000 to 7,000 miles. Your owner’s manual will have specific directions for your vehicle but typically rotating your tires every other time you change your oil should keep them wearing evenly.

Which direction should you rotate the tires? Side to side? Front to back? Do the hokey pokey and turn your tires around? Again, your owner’s manual will have a recommended pattern for your vehicle.

If you have a full-size spare tire (not a small “donut” spare), you should include the spare in the rotation so all five tires wear evenly. Follow the normal rotation pattern, but put the spare at the right rear corner. Whichever tire would have gone to the right rear goes in the trunk and becomes the new spare.

If you have questions about your vehicle’s tires, please call our service department at (866) 822-9314.

4 Issues That Cause Your Car to Shake

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4 Issues That Cause Your Car to Shake

Having your car shake, rattle, and roll while you’re driving can be both annoying and potentially unsafe. These questions may help to pinpoint the cause:

Does the vibration get more intense when you drive faster?

If so, the cause of the problem may be a bent axle. If you’ve recently had an accident, it’s possible that your axle is damaged. Another possibility is that the driveshaft-the spinning part between the engine and the gears that turn the vehicle’s wheels-is bent.

Does the vibration get worse when you hit the brakes? Feel a Pulsation in the Pedal?

You could have a problem with a warped brake rotor, the part that spins in relation to vehicle speed and is gripped by the brake pads to slow the car to a stop. Instead of being uniformly flat all the way across, a warped rotor is raised or depressed on part of its surface. The calipers and brake pads, which squeeze the brake rotors, can’t get an even grip on a warped rotor, resulting in vibration when you brake.

Do you feel the vibration mainly through your steering wheel?

Your first guess might be an alignment problem, but often the cause has more to do with wobbly wheels. If a wheel is not screwed on properly, or there’s a problem with the wheel bearings, tie-rod ends, or ball joints, you can end up with a vibration problem. Another source of wobble is a wheel that deviates from a perfectly circular rotation when it is spun.

OK, but what’s the most common cause of vehicle vibration?

Your tires.

If your car vibrates at various speeds, you may need a tire balance. If you notice uneven tire wear, then you may need a tire rotation. If your tires aren’t perfectly round and they’re rolling unevenly, then it may be time to have them replaced.

If your vehicle is vibrating, your best bet is to let us take a look so we can diagnose the exact problem. And, as with all car maintenance, the sooner you fix the problem, the better your chances for avoiding a bigger, more expensive one down the road.

To schedule an appointment with one of our certified technicians, please give us a call at (866) 822-9314.