Can You Repair That Tire Puncture?

tirepuncture

Can You Repair That Tire Puncture?

Nail in your tire? It’s important to know whether a puncture can be repaired or if the tire needs to be replaced. This video gives a simple explanation to help you understand when a repair is possible.

Tire punctures can only be repaired in the tread area and should not be more than a quarter inch in diameter.

Note: Quick DIY repairs do exist, but long-term repairs can only be completed by removing the tire from the wheel. A patch must be applied to seal the inner liner and the tire should be inspected for further damage.

Backup Cameras Are Now Required On All New Vehicles Sold in the US.

screen-shot-2018-05-04-at-3-55-44-pm-1525463771

As of May 1st, back up camers are now law.

Well it’s about time, right?

If you’re shopping for a new vehicle and it doesn’t have a backup camera or the feature costs extra, then it was built before Tuesday, May 1st, 2018. That’s when the safety device became standard on all vehicles made for the American market. The standardization is part of a U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) regulation issued in 2014, although Peter Kurdock, deputy general counsel with the Advocates for Highway & Auto Safety, said the effort to make backup cameras standard began back when George W. Bush was president. “It literally took us 10 years to get them into the cars,” Kurdock told Car and Driver.

The group, which is composed of property and casualty insurers as well as consumer advocates—known by the shorthand Advocates—joined other safety and consumer groups in suing the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in 2013, alleging that the federal agency had not done enough to standardize the equipment. In 2014, NHTSA mandated the devices be in all new cars as of May 1, 2018.

Advocates and other consumer-safety groups would like to see all cars equipped with other advanced-safety technology, such as automated-emergency braking (AEB) with forward-collision alert, blind-spot warning, and lane-departure warning. Twenty automakers have pledged to make AEB standard by 2022; the technology is prominently featured in many automakers’ lineups already, with the likes of Mercedes-Benz, Volvo, and Toyota leading the way.

But Advocates and others would like industry-wide standardization of these safety features to come sooner. Citing Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) figures, the group says rear automated braking reduces reverse-gear collisions by 62 percent, AEB with forward-collision warning cuts front-end wrecks by 50 percent, blind-spot warning reduces lane-changing accidents by 14 percent, and lane-departure warning cuts single-vehicle sideswipes and head-on crashes by 11 percent.

In the meantime, the regulation regarding backup cameras should help consumers save some money on what had previously been optional equipment on many new cars, Advocates said. Kurdock noted that backup cameras sometimes were bundled with parking assist and other sensor-activated features, or the cameras were rolled into pricier luxury packages along with unrelated items such as leather seats. For people whose cars do not have the feature, it’s possible to retrofit aftermarket systems; they range anywhere from about $100 to $200 for a full kit with an LCD screen.

From: Car and Driver

 

Why You Shouldn’t Start From a Stop in Second Gear.

Even if your car has the torque to accelerate from a stop in 2nd gear, doing so isn’t great for your clutch.

546b1ae9a584d_-_nunezshifter-lg

For one reason or another, there are times were you think it might be beneficial to start off from a stop in second gear rather than first in your manual transmission car. In most cases, though, doing that will cause more wear on your clutch. Why? Jason Fenske of Engineering Explained is here to, well, explain.

It all comes down to how much you have to slip the clutch to keep the engine from stalling. In first gear, you have to slip the clutch up to a certain speed (5 mph, for example) to get it fully engaged, while in second, you might have to slip the clutch for a longer time up to a higher speed (10 mph, lets say) to get it fully engaged. The only scenario where starting in second doesn’t incur more clutch wear is if you’re starting on a downhill, or you’re already rolling forward when you begin engaging the clutch.

Starting in second isn’t nearly as bad for an automatic transmission, which uses a fluid drive to transmit power to the transmission rather than a clutch plate. In fact, many new automatic cars often start out in second gear as a default unless you put them in a sport mode or mash the throttle from a stop. This is done for smoother acceleration and better fuel economy.

But those are very simple explanations. Let Fenske show you the ins and outs of why starting in second gear probably isn’t a good idea.

Sources:

Road & Track
Engineering Explained (Youtube)

Recognizing the Signs of Engine Damage

car-b-2017-03

Recognizing the Signs of Engine Damage

It’s not always easy to recognize when your vehicle is suffering from engine damage as symptoms can be overlooked and seen as “normal.” While not all sounds and smells may threaten the life of your engine, there are some obvious warning signs that require a vehicle inspection right away.

“Early diagnosis of engine damage can most likely be treated, but it is important to be aware of potentially damaging symptoms and have the vehicle inspected if something doesn’t seem right,” said Rich White, executive director of the Car Care Council. “By acting quickly and making necessary repairs as soon as possible, you could be saving yourself from the cost and hassle of breaking down along the road.”

One of the signs of engine trouble is an illuminated check engine light. This light indicates that a vehicle system, such as the ignition, fuel injection or emission control, is not operating properly, even if the vehicle appears to be running normally. Ignoring the check engine light can negatively impact your fuel economy or cause damage resulting in more costly repairs.

Many motorists are familiar with the noises their vehicles make on a daily basis. However, any noise that is new, different or suspicious may indicate a problem, including a high-pitched squeal, grinding or thumping. Sounds under the hood, such as hissing, can also indicate that your vehicle is in need of attention.

Although all cars burn fossil fuels that create undesired emissions, these odors should remain outside of the car. Unusual smells that could signal engine damage include burnt rubber, hot oil, gasoline, the sweet smell of syrup, burning carpet and rotten eggs. When you smell any peculiar odor, you should not ignore it.

Another symptom of engine damage is excessive amounts of smoke or steam. Although some smoke is normal, excessive amounts of dark smoke, in particular, indicates that oil is leaking into the combustion chamber and is being burned along with the gasoline.

If you have questions about your vehicle or need to schedule a service appointment, please give us a call at (866) 822-9314.

When Should You Rotate Your Tires?

tires-2017-03-b

When Should You Rotate Your Tires?

Being a front tire can be hard work. A front tire typically has to deal with more weight including the car’s engine, is responsible for all of the steering duties, and when you hit the brakes – the front tires get all of the vehicle’s weight shifting forward. All of these factors can lead to uneven tire wear between the front and back tires.

By rotating your tires to different positions on your vehicle, you help avoid uneven tire wear. This helps you extend the life of your tires, maintain a smooth ride and get better gas mileage.

So how often do they need to be rotated? Schedules range from every 3,000 to 7,000 miles. Your owner’s manual will have specific directions for your vehicle but typically rotating your tires every other time you change your oil should keep them wearing evenly.

Which direction should you rotate the tires? Side to side? Front to back? Do the hokey pokey and turn your tires around? Again, your owner’s manual will have a recommended pattern for your vehicle.

If you have a full-size spare tire (not a small “donut” spare), you should include the spare in the rotation so all five tires wear evenly. Follow the normal rotation pattern, but put the spare at the right rear corner. Whichever tire would have gone to the right rear goes in the trunk and becomes the new spare.

If you have questions about your vehicle’s tires, please call our service department at (866) 822-9314.

Are You Ruining Your Transmission with These 5 Common Bad Habits?

Are You Ruining Your Transmission with These 5 Common Bad Habits?

Is it okay to coast down a hill in neutral? Should you put the car in neutral when you come to a stop? What is the safest way to launch an automatic car? Is it okay to switch from reverse to drive while the vehicle is moving? What happens when you put the vehicle in park?

This video from Engineering Explained gives you the answers to these questions about driving with an automatic transmission. Here are the highlights:

Never coast downhill in neutral. Most modern automatic transmissions cut fuel to the engine on their own, so putting your car in neutral won’t save you any gas. More importantly, it takes some control away from you and it’s illegal in 15 states.

Never switch directions without stopping. Make sure you come to a complete stop before going from drive to reverse or vice versa. Otherwise you’re using your transmission to stop the vehicle instead of letting your brakes do their job, which isn’t a good idea.

Never “launch” your vehicle. Don’t rev your car’s engine in neutral and drop into drive to propel yourself forward, because it’s a fast way to wear out the bands in your transmission (they’re expensive to replace).
Never put your car in neutral at a stop light – it won’t save you any measurable fuel (a tiny fraction of a gallon at most) and it can cause wear on the transmission.

Never shift into park until you’ve come to a complete stop. Some cars won’t even let you do this, but you should never attempt it in any case – you may damage or break the locking pin that’s used to keep your transmission from running.

If you have questions about your vehicle or need to schedule service, please give us a call at (866) 822-9314.