10simple Summer Car Care Tips

HondaOakland

10 Simple Summer Car Care Tips

While drivers are busy enjoying a whole range of fun summertime adventures, including family road trips, trekking the kids to summer camp, and regular jaunts to the pool, it can be easy to forget to pay attention to car maintenance, beyond your typical gas fill-up. But because the heat can really take its toll on your vehicle, here are 10 Simple Summer Car-Care Tips to keep your vehicle in great shape:

1. Keep your cool: Staying cool is important, not just for you, but also for your car. Beyond checking the level of coolant fluid, be sure to inspect the state of the hoses and coolant reservoir, keeping an eye out for leaks. Squeeze the hoses (when the engine is cool) from time to time to make sure they feel firm and not excessively squishy or soft.

2. Tighten up your belt: There usually is a serpentine belt that runs between the alternator, the fan and several other components that can become loose or deteriorate over time. It needs to be in good condition and at the right amount of tension, so if you see cracks or small pieces missing, it’s time to replace the belt.

3. Clear your vision: Summer rain showers really can do a number on wearing out your windshield wipers, creating nasty streaks across your windshield and affecting your vision while driving. Replacing your wipers is not costly so you may want to inquire about wiper installation during your regular oil changes.

4. Stay hydrated: Check oil, brake, power-steering and windshield-washer fluids regularly, as these liquids are in constant use and are key to your vehicle functioning properly.

5. Crank the air: Air conditioning is a summer essential, so if the system hasn’t been working properly in recent months, summer certainly is the time to get serious about repairing any leaks or issues. Have one of our qualified mechanics fix the leak before paying to have the air-conditioning system recharged.

6. Clean your filters: Summer is the time to have your air filter replaced. Many modern cars also have pollen filters or cabin filtration systems, so be sure to take a look at those, too. And, as always, when in doubt, please give us a call.

7. Under pressure: Tires really need to be checked regularly all year round, and summertime is no exception. Pressures must be correct (consult the manual for levels specific to your vehicle), treads should be free of stones or stray nails, and all four tires should be in good condition (meaning no cracks, no uneven wear, and plenty of tread depth). Don’t forget to also check your spare to be sure it’s usable.

8. Throw some shade: Don’t underestimate the benefit of a dashboard sunshade for those times when you’re not driving but the car is still out in the sun. It helps to protect the dashboard and interior against ultraviolet rays, prevent fading over time, and, in the short term, keep the interior a little cooler.

9. Keep it clean: Those long, balmy evenings when the sun seems to hang low for hours can be lovely, but also hazardous if your car’s windshield is dirty. Any haze on it can diffuse the light and make things hard to see, so be sure to keep your car’s exterior clean. Things look much sharper after your car has had a good wash, and regular washings protect the paintwork from the sun’s rays.

10. Plan accordingly: It’s hot out there, so keep the driver and passengers happy by making sure everyone stays hydrated. Plan road trips by making lists of what you’ll need to keep everyone in the car content during the journey (for example, sunglasses, travel mugs, games for the kids, snacks, phone chargers, etc.). And don’t forget to have those just-in-case items like a flashlight and a small tool kit handy. Be sure your license and insurance are up to date, and remember to keep tabs on your vehicle’s scheduled service.

“You may have summer vacation on the brain,” says Brian Moody, executive editor at Autotrader, “but your vehicle is working even harder in the warmer temps. Because it is so important to keep your car running well during the hot summer months, these few simple tips can help keep things running smoothly so you and your passengers can relax and enjoy the ride.”

If you have questions or need to schedule a service appointment, please give us a call at (866) 822-9314.

2019 Honda HR-V Gets Lots of New Stuff

HondaOakland

2019 Honda HR-V Gets Lots of New Stuff

The 2019 Honda HR-V begins arriving today. The 2019 Honda HR-V gets a new look, new trims, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration and available Honda Sensing.

For 2019, HR-V expands its appeal with the addition of new Sport and Touring trims, refreshed styling, new technology, and a more refined driving experience, adding to an already established reputation as a versatile and sporty 5-door subcompact SUV.

For the first time, HR-V now features the Honda Sensing suite of advanced safety and driver-assistive technologies-including but not limited to Collision Mitigation Braking System, Road Departure Mitigation, Adaptive Cruise Control, and Lane Keeping Assist,-standard on EX and above trims, making Honda Sensing available on every model Honda sells.

All 2019 HR-V models feature new styling, with revised bumpers, headlights, grille, and taillights, while the new HR-V Sport and Touring trims get a unique look all their own. Blackout trim and 18-inch wheels visually distinguish HR-V Sport trims, while the all-wheel-drive-only Touring trim gets multi-element LED headlights, dark chrome trim, and LED fog lights.

Inside, HR-V benefits from a new Display Audio system featuring a simplified interface that includes a volume knob and the addition of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration. The navigation system, available exclusively in Touring trims, has also been improved with sharper graphics and 3D landmarks. All models feature a redesigned driver’s meter with a large analog speedometer and digital tachometer. EX models and above receive a 4.2-inch Thin-Film Transistor Driver Information Interface color display offering additional selectable information including available turn-by-turn directions.

For more information on the new HR-V, please give us a call at (866) 822-9314, or to shop online, click here.

How to Use Remote Engine Start on the Accord

How to Use Remote Engine Start on the Accord

Imagine being able to start your Honda Accord well before you get in, so the climate control system can make it exceedingly comfortable inside ahead of your arrival. That’s the idea of remote engine start system. This informative video will explain the process for starting and extending the engine run time, how the climate control system and seat heaters are designed to interact with remote start, and what you need to do to get in and drive.

To schedule a test drive of one of our new Hondas, please give us a call at (866) 822-9314.

Don’t Let Adults Ride in Your Back Seat Until You Read This

Don’t Let Adults Ride in Your Back Seat Until You Read This

The results of a recent study found that drivers are twice as likely to be killed in crashes when the occupant behind them is unbuckled – and that roughly one out of four adult passengers don’t wear a safety belt when riding in the back seat.

Adults have gotten the message that it’s safer for kids to ride in the back seat properly restrained, but when it comes to their own safety, there’s a common misconception that buckling up is optional. Among adults who admit to not always using safety belts in the back seat, four out of five surveyed by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety say that short trips or when traveling by taxi or ride-hailing service are times they don’t bother to use a belt.

The survey reveals that many rear-seat passengers don’t think belts are necessary because they perceive the back seat to be safer than the front. This shows a clear misunderstanding about why belts are important, no matter where a person sits in a vehicle.

Before the majority of Americans got into the habit of buckling up, the back seat was the safest place to sit, and the center rear seat was the safest place of all in 1960s–1970s vehicles. In recent decades, high levels of restraint use and the advent of belt crash tensioners, airbags, and crashworthy vehicle designs have narrowed the safety advantages of riding in the rear seat for teens and adults.

“For most adults, it’s still as safe to ride in the back seat as the front seat, but not if you aren’t buckled up,” says Jessica Jermakian, an IIHS senior research engineer and a coauthor of the study. “That applies to riding in an Uber, Lyft or other hired vehicle, too.”

Although safety belts are proven to save lives, more than half of the people who die in passenger vehicle crashes in the U.S. each year are unbelted. One person’s decision not to buckle up can have consequences for other people riding with them.

“People who don’t use safety belts might think their neglect won’t hurt anyone else. That’s not the case,” Jermakian says. “In the rear seat, a lap/shoulder belt is the primary means of protection in a frontal crash. Without it, bodies can hit hard surfaces or other people at full speed, leading to serious injuries.”

Prime-age adults (35- to 54-year-olds) were the least likely group to report always buckling up in the back seat: 66 percent of this group reported always using a belt in back, compared with 76 percent of adults 55 and older and 73 percent of adults 18 to 34.

Women were more likely than men to report always using a belt in the rear seat, and adults who had attended college were more likely to buckle up than adults with less education. These findings are in line with prior surveys of belt use.

When asked why they don’t buckle up, a quarter of respondents in the group who reported buckling up less often in the back seat than in the front said they believe the rear seat is safer than the front, and so using a belt isn’t necessary. The next most popular reason this group gave was that using a belt isn’t a habit or that they forget about it or simply never or rarely use it. Uncomfortable or poorly fitting belts was cited as a reason for not buckling up by 12 percent of respondents, and 10 percent said that the belt is difficult to use or that they can’t find the belt or buckle.

People who reported that most of their trips as a rear-seat passenger were in hired vehicles were more likely to report not always using their safety belt than passengers in personal vehicles. In the survey, 57 percent of passengers in hired vehicles reported always using their belt in the rear seat, compared with 74 percent of passengers in personal vehicles.

“If your cab or ride-hailing driver is involved in a crash, you want that safety belt,” Jermakian says. “Even if state law says belts are optional, go ahead and buckle up anyway. If you can’t find the belt or it’s inaccessible, ask your driver for help.”

Nearly two-thirds of part-time belt users and nonusers said audible rear-seat belt reminders would make them more likely to buckle up. IIHS studies have shown that driver belt use is higher and fatality rates are lower in vehicles with enhanced belt reminders than in vehicles without them. Few vehicles have belt reminders for the rear seat.

Nearly 40 percent of people surveyed said they sometimes don’t buckle up in the rear seat because there is no law requiring it. If there were such a law, 60 percent of respondents said it would convince them to use belts in the back seat. A greater percentage said they would be more likely to buckle up if the driver could get pulled over because someone in the back wasn’t buckled.

Except for New Hampshire, all states and the District of Columbia require adults in the front seat to use belts. All rear-seat passengers are covered by laws in 29 states and D.C. Of these laws, 20 carry primary enforcement, meaning a police officer can stop a driver solely for a belt-law violation. The rest are secondary, so an officer must have another reason to stop a vehicle before issuing a safety-belt citation.

More than half of part-time users and nonusers of rear-seat belts said that, in addition to stronger belt laws, more-comfortable belts would make them more likely to buckle up. They want softer or padded ones and shoulder belts that are adjustable so they won’t rub against the neck. Tight and locking belts are turnoffs for them. Participants cited a variety of comfort and usability issues, regardless of age or body size.

Early Days of Automotive Air Conditioning

Some readers may not realize that automtive air conditioning wasn’t always standard.

A/C was installed in only 0.4% of all US cars in ’53 (1 in every 240), and in the GM line, anyway, was a $600 option — on cars whose base price ranged from about $1900 to $2400! GM’s system was similar to the one shown here, and although Desoto’s intake grilles are more attractive, GM’s system of flanking clear plastic tubes which delivered cooled air under the headliner to each seating station was superior. The MoPAR setup shown here ensured that the cold air produced by its trunk-mounted evaporator and fan followed the curve of the headliner inside the car, directly from rear to front, ending up right on the driver’s neck and shoulders, which soon stiffened up as a result. GM’s units were offered on only their highest-end, senior cars — Cadillacs, Buick Roadmasters and Supers, and the uppermost Oldsmobile, as well as on their limousines and other big commercial cars. Fun fact: Having surveyed the competition for ’53, GM’s marketing dept. put so much pressure on Engineering to get an A/C system ready that the engineers forgot to include in their design a disengagement clutch on the compressor. Thus, every Spring you’d have to go to your friendly GM dealer, he’d install the special A/C drive belt that came with each air-conditioned car, and you’d have A/C — like it or not — continuously until the Fall, when you’d have the belt taken off. Like the telescreen in the novel 1984, you could turn the system DOWN, but not OFF. This defect was remedied for ’54, when a clutch was finally included.

Source: Robert Haworth/Youtube