Extended Service Hours Now Open Sunday!

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Extended Service Hours: Now Open Sunday

We keep looking for ways to provide you with the best service available. That’s why we are excited to announce that our new service hours are Monday through Friday from 7am-7pm, Saturdays from 7am – 6pm and Sundays from 9am – 5:30pm.

We know your schedule is busy and that sometimes there’s not enough time to get everything done. Now you can schedule your vehicle repairs and maintenance whenever it is most convenient for you.

For more information, please call us at (866) 822-9314 or schedule your service online at https://www.hondaoakland.com/service-scheduler.htm

Honda Named Best Overall Brand and Best Value

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Can You Repair That Tire Puncture?

Nail in your tire? It’s important to know whether a puncture can be repaired or if the tire needs to be replaced. This video gives a simple explanation to help you understand when a repair is possible.

Tire punctures can only be repaired in the tread area and should not be more than a quarter inch in diameter.

Note: Quick DIY repairs do exist, but long-term repairs can only be completed by removing the tire from the wheel. A patch must be applied to seal the inner liner and the tire should be inspected for further damage.

Why Cheaper Gas May Cost You More Money

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Why Cheaper Gas May Cost You More Money

I thought regular 89 octane gas was the same from station to station. As it turns out, it isn’t. What’s even worse is the cheaper gas you can get at some gas stations can cause engine issues.

The American Automobile Association (AAA) recently conducted a study and found significant differences in the quality of gasoline sold at fuel retailers. They discovered that off-brand gasolines can cause “19 times more engine deposits” than “top tier” brands, which have more detergent in their mix. The problem can occur after just 4,000 miles of simulated driving.

According to the AAA, “Such carbon deposits are known to reduce fuel economy, increase emissions and negatively impact vehicle performance, particularly on newer vehicles.” They also said the top tier brands with more detergent additives are much better for your car and your mileage, too.

The list of top tier gasoline brands that passed AAA’s test includes the nation’s major consumer brands, such as Exxon Mobil, Conoco, BP, Shell, Chevron, Citgo, Phillips 66 and Valero. You can view the full list of top tier brands at: http://www.toptiergas.com/licensedbrands/

An additional AAA study found drivers are six times more likely to choose a gas station based on the price of gasoline, rather than the quality of the fuel. Since top tier gasoline is widely available and only an average of three cents more per gallon, AAA urges drivers to reconsider their priorities when selecting a gas station.

“Fortunately, consumers can reverse some engine deposits simply by switching gasoline brands,” said Greg Brannon, AAA’s director of Automotive Engineering. “After a few thousand miles with top tier gasoline, performance issues like rough idling or hesitation during acceleration can often be resolved.”

The next time you need to refuel, you may want to consider quality over cost of the gas. Pumping gas with a detergent additive may give you better performance and mileage.

Can You Repair That Tire Puncture?

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Can You Repair That Tire Puncture?

Nail in your tire? It’s important to know whether a puncture can be repaired or if the tire needs to be replaced. This video gives a simple explanation to help you understand when a repair is possible.

Tire punctures can only be repaired in the tread area and should not be more than a quarter inch in diameter.

Note: Quick DIY repairs do exist, but long-term repairs can only be completed by removing the tire from the wheel. A patch must be applied to seal the inner liner and the tire should be inspected for further damage.

Backup Cameras Are Now Required On All New Vehicles Sold in the US.

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As of May 1st, back up camers are now law.

Well it’s about time, right?

If you’re shopping for a new vehicle and it doesn’t have a backup camera or the feature costs extra, then it was built before Tuesday, May 1st, 2018. That’s when the safety device became standard on all vehicles made for the American market. The standardization is part of a U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) regulation issued in 2014, although Peter Kurdock, deputy general counsel with the Advocates for Highway & Auto Safety, said the effort to make backup cameras standard began back when George W. Bush was president. “It literally took us 10 years to get them into the cars,” Kurdock told Car and Driver.

The group, which is composed of property and casualty insurers as well as consumer advocates—known by the shorthand Advocates—joined other safety and consumer groups in suing the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in 2013, alleging that the federal agency had not done enough to standardize the equipment. In 2014, NHTSA mandated the devices be in all new cars as of May 1, 2018.

Advocates and other consumer-safety groups would like to see all cars equipped with other advanced-safety technology, such as automated-emergency braking (AEB) with forward-collision alert, blind-spot warning, and lane-departure warning. Twenty automakers have pledged to make AEB standard by 2022; the technology is prominently featured in many automakers’ lineups already, with the likes of Mercedes-Benz, Volvo, and Toyota leading the way.

But Advocates and others would like industry-wide standardization of these safety features to come sooner. Citing Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) figures, the group says rear automated braking reduces reverse-gear collisions by 62 percent, AEB with forward-collision warning cuts front-end wrecks by 50 percent, blind-spot warning reduces lane-changing accidents by 14 percent, and lane-departure warning cuts single-vehicle sideswipes and head-on crashes by 11 percent.

In the meantime, the regulation regarding backup cameras should help consumers save some money on what had previously been optional equipment on many new cars, Advocates said. Kurdock noted that backup cameras sometimes were bundled with parking assist and other sensor-activated features, or the cameras were rolled into pricier luxury packages along with unrelated items such as leather seats. For people whose cars do not have the feature, it’s possible to retrofit aftermarket systems; they range anywhere from about $100 to $200 for a full kit with an LCD screen.

From: Car and Driver

 

Why You Shouldn’t Start From a Stop in Second Gear.

Even if your car has the torque to accelerate from a stop in 2nd gear, doing so isn’t great for your clutch.

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For one reason or another, there are times were you think it might be beneficial to start off from a stop in second gear rather than first in your manual transmission car. In most cases, though, doing that will cause more wear on your clutch. Why? Jason Fenske of Engineering Explained is here to, well, explain.

It all comes down to how much you have to slip the clutch to keep the engine from stalling. In first gear, you have to slip the clutch up to a certain speed (5 mph, for example) to get it fully engaged, while in second, you might have to slip the clutch for a longer time up to a higher speed (10 mph, lets say) to get it fully engaged. The only scenario where starting in second doesn’t incur more clutch wear is if you’re starting on a downhill, or you’re already rolling forward when you begin engaging the clutch.

Starting in second isn’t nearly as bad for an automatic transmission, which uses a fluid drive to transmit power to the transmission rather than a clutch plate. In fact, many new automatic cars often start out in second gear as a default unless you put them in a sport mode or mash the throttle from a stop. This is done for smoother acceleration and better fuel economy.

But those are very simple explanations. Let Fenske show you the ins and outs of why starting in second gear probably isn’t a good idea.

Sources:

Road & Track
Engineering Explained (Youtube)