2019 Honda HR-V Gets Lots of New Stuff

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2019 Honda HR-V Gets Lots of New Stuff

The 2019 Honda HR-V begins arriving today. The 2019 Honda HR-V gets a new look, new trims, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration and available Honda Sensing.

For 2019, HR-V expands its appeal with the addition of new Sport and Touring trims, refreshed styling, new technology, and a more refined driving experience, adding to an already established reputation as a versatile and sporty 5-door subcompact SUV.

For the first time, HR-V now features the Honda Sensing suite of advanced safety and driver-assistive technologies-including but not limited to Collision Mitigation Braking System, Road Departure Mitigation, Adaptive Cruise Control, and Lane Keeping Assist,-standard on EX and above trims, making Honda Sensing available on every model Honda sells.

All 2019 HR-V models feature new styling, with revised bumpers, headlights, grille, and taillights, while the new HR-V Sport and Touring trims get a unique look all their own. Blackout trim and 18-inch wheels visually distinguish HR-V Sport trims, while the all-wheel-drive-only Touring trim gets multi-element LED headlights, dark chrome trim, and LED fog lights.

Inside, HR-V benefits from a new Display Audio system featuring a simplified interface that includes a volume knob and the addition of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration. The navigation system, available exclusively in Touring trims, has also been improved with sharper graphics and 3D landmarks. All models feature a redesigned driver’s meter with a large analog speedometer and digital tachometer. EX models and above receive a 4.2-inch Thin-Film Transistor Driver Information Interface color display offering additional selectable information including available turn-by-turn directions.

For more information on the new HR-V, please give us a call at (866) 822-9314, or to shop online, click here.

How to Use Remote Engine Start on the Accord

How to Use Remote Engine Start on the Accord

Imagine being able to start your Honda Accord well before you get in, so the climate control system can make it exceedingly comfortable inside ahead of your arrival. That’s the idea of remote engine start system. This informative video will explain the process for starting and extending the engine run time, how the climate control system and seat heaters are designed to interact with remote start, and what you need to do to get in and drive.

To schedule a test drive of one of our new Hondas, please give us a call at (866) 822-9314.

Don’t Let Adults Ride in Your Back Seat Until You Read This

Don’t Let Adults Ride in Your Back Seat Until You Read This

The results of a recent study found that drivers are twice as likely to be killed in crashes when the occupant behind them is unbuckled – and that roughly one out of four adult passengers don’t wear a safety belt when riding in the back seat.

Adults have gotten the message that it’s safer for kids to ride in the back seat properly restrained, but when it comes to their own safety, there’s a common misconception that buckling up is optional. Among adults who admit to not always using safety belts in the back seat, four out of five surveyed by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety say that short trips or when traveling by taxi or ride-hailing service are times they don’t bother to use a belt.

The survey reveals that many rear-seat passengers don’t think belts are necessary because they perceive the back seat to be safer than the front. This shows a clear misunderstanding about why belts are important, no matter where a person sits in a vehicle.

Before the majority of Americans got into the habit of buckling up, the back seat was the safest place to sit, and the center rear seat was the safest place of all in 1960s–1970s vehicles. In recent decades, high levels of restraint use and the advent of belt crash tensioners, airbags, and crashworthy vehicle designs have narrowed the safety advantages of riding in the rear seat for teens and adults.

“For most adults, it’s still as safe to ride in the back seat as the front seat, but not if you aren’t buckled up,” says Jessica Jermakian, an IIHS senior research engineer and a coauthor of the study. “That applies to riding in an Uber, Lyft or other hired vehicle, too.”

Although safety belts are proven to save lives, more than half of the people who die in passenger vehicle crashes in the U.S. each year are unbelted. One person’s decision not to buckle up can have consequences for other people riding with them.

“People who don’t use safety belts might think their neglect won’t hurt anyone else. That’s not the case,” Jermakian says. “In the rear seat, a lap/shoulder belt is the primary means of protection in a frontal crash. Without it, bodies can hit hard surfaces or other people at full speed, leading to serious injuries.”

Prime-age adults (35- to 54-year-olds) were the least likely group to report always buckling up in the back seat: 66 percent of this group reported always using a belt in back, compared with 76 percent of adults 55 and older and 73 percent of adults 18 to 34.

Women were more likely than men to report always using a belt in the rear seat, and adults who had attended college were more likely to buckle up than adults with less education. These findings are in line with prior surveys of belt use.

When asked why they don’t buckle up, a quarter of respondents in the group who reported buckling up less often in the back seat than in the front said they believe the rear seat is safer than the front, and so using a belt isn’t necessary. The next most popular reason this group gave was that using a belt isn’t a habit or that they forget about it or simply never or rarely use it. Uncomfortable or poorly fitting belts was cited as a reason for not buckling up by 12 percent of respondents, and 10 percent said that the belt is difficult to use or that they can’t find the belt or buckle.

People who reported that most of their trips as a rear-seat passenger were in hired vehicles were more likely to report not always using their safety belt than passengers in personal vehicles. In the survey, 57 percent of passengers in hired vehicles reported always using their belt in the rear seat, compared with 74 percent of passengers in personal vehicles.

“If your cab or ride-hailing driver is involved in a crash, you want that safety belt,” Jermakian says. “Even if state law says belts are optional, go ahead and buckle up anyway. If you can’t find the belt or it’s inaccessible, ask your driver for help.”

Nearly two-thirds of part-time belt users and nonusers said audible rear-seat belt reminders would make them more likely to buckle up. IIHS studies have shown that driver belt use is higher and fatality rates are lower in vehicles with enhanced belt reminders than in vehicles without them. Few vehicles have belt reminders for the rear seat.

Nearly 40 percent of people surveyed said they sometimes don’t buckle up in the rear seat because there is no law requiring it. If there were such a law, 60 percent of respondents said it would convince them to use belts in the back seat. A greater percentage said they would be more likely to buckle up if the driver could get pulled over because someone in the back wasn’t buckled.

Except for New Hampshire, all states and the District of Columbia require adults in the front seat to use belts. All rear-seat passengers are covered by laws in 29 states and D.C. Of these laws, 20 carry primary enforcement, meaning a police officer can stop a driver solely for a belt-law violation. The rest are secondary, so an officer must have another reason to stop a vehicle before issuing a safety-belt citation.

More than half of part-time users and nonusers of rear-seat belts said that, in addition to stronger belt laws, more-comfortable belts would make them more likely to buckle up. They want softer or padded ones and shoulder belts that are adjustable so they won’t rub against the neck. Tight and locking belts are turnoffs for them. Participants cited a variety of comfort and usability issues, regardless of age or body size.

Early Days of Automotive Air Conditioning

Some readers may not realize that automtive air conditioning wasn’t always standard.

A/C was installed in only 0.4% of all US cars in ’53 (1 in every 240), and in the GM line, anyway, was a $600 option — on cars whose base price ranged from about $1900 to $2400! GM’s system was similar to the one shown here, and although Desoto’s intake grilles are more attractive, GM’s system of flanking clear plastic tubes which delivered cooled air under the headliner to each seating station was superior. The MoPAR setup shown here ensured that the cold air produced by its trunk-mounted evaporator and fan followed the curve of the headliner inside the car, directly from rear to front, ending up right on the driver’s neck and shoulders, which soon stiffened up as a result. GM’s units were offered on only their highest-end, senior cars — Cadillacs, Buick Roadmasters and Supers, and the uppermost Oldsmobile, as well as on their limousines and other big commercial cars. Fun fact: Having surveyed the competition for ’53, GM’s marketing dept. put so much pressure on Engineering to get an A/C system ready that the engineers forgot to include in their design a disengagement clutch on the compressor. Thus, every Spring you’d have to go to your friendly GM dealer, he’d install the special A/C drive belt that came with each air-conditioned car, and you’d have A/C — like it or not — continuously until the Fall, when you’d have the belt taken off. Like the telescreen in the novel 1984, you could turn the system DOWN, but not OFF. This defect was remedied for ’54, when a clutch was finally included.

Source: Robert Haworth/Youtube

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All-New 2019 Insight Brings Style, Sophistication and 55 mpg

The 2019 Honda Insight offers class-leading power and passenger space, universally appealing styling, and received a 55 mpg(2) city from the EPA (LX/EX), while simultaneously bringing a new level of driving sophistication and style to the compact hybrid market. Boasting a high level of standard premium features, Insight’s Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price(1) starts at $22,830 (excluding $895 destination and handling).

Insight’s body, chassis and powertrain combination provide a surprisingly satisfying driving experience. Total system output of 151-horsepower provides brisk acceleration compared to other hybrids, yet it also received a 55 mpg city rating (LX/EX), putting it among the best hybrids on the market. Furthermore, with its comparatively low starting price, Insight makes it easier than ever to save at the pump while looking good doing it.

Insight comes in three different trim levels: LX, EX, and Touring. All Insights come standard with multi-element LED headlights, push-button start, and the Honda Sensing suite of advanced safety and driver-assistive technologies. Among other features, Insight EX adds an 8-inch Display Audio with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration, while Insight Touring adds leather seating surfaces, an 8-way power driver’s seat, Honda Satellite-Linked Navigation System, dual-zone automatic climate control, and more.

The 2019 Insight is powered by the third generation of Honda’s innovative two-motor hybrid drivetrain. A 1.5-liter DOHC i-VTEC Atkinson-cycle inline-4 engine with 40.5-percent thermal efficiency is paired to an electric propulsion motor that produces 197 lb.-ft. of torque for a class-leading total system output of 151 horsepower. Thanks to its clever two-motor design, Insight operates without the need for a conventional automatic transmission.

Insight helps drivers maximize energy regeneration through the use of steering wheel-mounted Deceleration Selectors. Working similar to transmission paddle shifters, Insight’s Deceleration Selectors let the driver toggle between three different levels of regenerative braking performance. Tap the left selector to increase regenerative braking, and the right to reduce it. This system not only increases battery charging via regeneration, it also helps reduce stress on the brakes, and lets drivers tailor their regenerative braking level for different driving conditions.

Insight’s hybrid powertrain uses power from the gasoline engine and electric motors to accommodate the current driving conditions, seamlessly shifting through three distinct drive operations. In EV Drive, Insight is powered solely by its electric drive motor, drawing power from the battery. In Hybrid Drive the gasoline engine drives a generator motor to supply electrical power to the drive motor. In certain circumstances, Engine Drive operation connects the gasoline engine directly to the drive wheels.

The 2019 Insight’s battery is housed in a compact intelligent power unit (IPU) mounted under the rear seats, allowing Insight to offer an uncompromised 15.1 cubic feet of trunk space (LX/EX) that rivals many midsize sedans, and a folding rear seatback for long loads (60/40 split in EX and Touring trims). With up to 97.6 cubic feet of interior space and class-leading rear legroom, Insight’s interior packaging also offers the best passenger space in its class.

The 2019 Insight joins an expanding lineup of electrified Honda vehicles that includes the Clarity series – Clarity Fuel Cell, Clarity Electric and Clarity Plug-In Hybrid – and the recently introduced Accord Hybrid. These models represent the next generation of Honda vehicles as the company advances toward its global initiative to grow electrified vehicle sales to two-thirds by 2030.

The 2019 Honda Insight for the North American market is manufactured, using domestic and globally-sourced parts, exclusively at Honda’s Greensburg, Indiana auto plant alongside Civic and CR-V. Its hybrid powertrain, including the 1.5-liter Atkinson-cycle, two-motor system and intelligent power unit (IPU) containing the hybrid battery pack, is produced in Ohio.

For more information on the all-new 2019 Honda Insight or to schedule a personal driving experience, please give us a call at (866) 822-9314.

(1) MSRP plus $895 destination charge, excluding tax, license, registration and options. Dealer prices may
vary.
(2) Based on 2019 model-year EPA ratings for LX/EX models. Use for comparison purposes only. Your MPG
will vary depending on driving conditions, how you drive and maintain your vehicle, lithium-ion battery
pack age/condition and other factors.

Drivers Who Merge at the Last Minute Are Annoying, but They’re Right

Drivers Who Merge at the Last Minute Are Annoying, but They’re Right

Summer is full of road construction and lane closures. What’s the best way to merge to another lane when yours is closing? You have two options:

1. The courteous approach
Immediately turn on your blinker and patiently wait until somebody lets you merge in.

2. The zipper approach
Ignore the early mergers, zoom ahead and move over at the end of the lane to merge like a closing zipper. (You’ll want to avoid making contact with the early mergers who most likely will not appreciate your “cutting in line” tactic.)

Surprisingly, studies show that the zipper approach is actually the best one to keep traffic moving efficiently. In this system, every car in the lane that’s ending drives all the way up to the front of the line and takes turns merging with the other lane of traffic. (From above, it looks a bit like teeth on a zipper coming together.) Because the system uses all of the available road space for as long as possible, it cuts congestion by 40 percent. It also reduces crashes because all traffic is moving at the same rate of speed rather than some cars going very fast while others poke along.

Some states like Missouri have even created their own videos to help educate drivers about this more efficient approach to merging in heavy traffic – see below.

What do you think? After reading this information, will you merge immediately when you see lane closure signs, or will you wait until the last possible moment?

2018 Accord and Odyssey Named the Best

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2018 Accord and Odyssey Named the Best

The all-new 2018 Honda Accord and Odyssey have been recognized on the list of “10 Best Family Cars 2018” from Parents magazine and Edmunds.com. The winners will appear in this month’s issue of Parents magazine.

To determine winners of its Best Family Cars awards, Parents magazine and Edmunds chose the winners from among 300 vehicles by considering safety ratings, car seat installation and other family-friendly features, as well as overall vehicle attributes such as driving dynamics, comfort, price and fuel efficiency. More information about the “10 Best Family Car” awards can be found at Parents.com/BestCars.

The 5th-generation Odyssey was completely redesigned for the 2018 model year raising the bar for performance, cabin quietness, family-friendly interior space, comfort and connectivity to even better meet the needs of changing American families, such as CabinWatch, the industry’s first in-vehicle rear-seat camera, and the available Honda Sensing suite of active safety and driver assist systems.

The reimagined 2018 Accord is the 10th-generation of Honda’s iconic midsized sedan, boasting premium styling focusing on an aggressive stance and proportion, a spacious interior, torque-laden turbo engines in both 1.5- and 2.0-liter capacities, agile driving dynamics and rich feature content that includes standard Honda Sensing on all models.

For more information on the award-winning Accord or Odyssey, please give us call at (866) 822-9314.

Top 3 Car Wash Mistakes

 

 

Top 3 Car Washing Mistakes

This video shares some simple solutions to help you avoid the car-washing mistakes that can ruin a vehicle’s paint.

Here’s a quick summary:

1. Sponges used for bathing are designed to rub or scrub away dead skin. If you use these on your car, your paint may be scratched as abrasive grit is pushed against the surface. Instead, use car-wash mitts that are designed to pick up the dirt and carry the debris within the fibers until it is released into a bucket of clean water.

2. Avoid using dish soap to wash your car, because it’s harmful to the paint. Soaps have specific purposes. For instance, you wouldn’t use hand soap to shampoo your hair. Soaps for washing your car are formulated to remove the dirt with as much lubrication as possible in order to leave the paint’s clear coat or wax unharmed.

3. Avoid using the same towel on both the wheels and the paint, since that will quickly damage the clear coat and require a polish or even a compound to remove. Instead, use separate towels or tools for the different parts of the car.

Questions or comments? Please give us a call at (866) 822-9314.

How to Operate a Manual Transmission

How to Operate a Manual Transmission

Honda offers manual transmissions across an array of models and trims, which is why we produced a video to not only help you learn how to drive a manual-equipped vehicle, but also explain why you’re doing it.

Not only do cars with manual transmissions costs less, but they are great vehicles for a teen drivers – if you need to use your right hand for shifting it’s hard to be talking on your phone. 🙂

For more information on Hondas available with manual transmissions, please give us a call at (866) 822-9314.